Power + Green NH3 Synthesizer = Zero Emission Fuel for less cost than gasoline or diesel



IMPORTANT NOTICE: Contrary to the unfounded claims made by certain stock advisors, Roger Gordon has not sold, transferred or licensed any rights to or interest in his patents to any other company in Canada, the USA or elsewhere. For up to date and accurate information on the intellectual property of Green NH3 or Roger Gordon, please contact us.


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Green NH3 is a patented, refrigerator sized machine that manufactures green, sustainable ammonia (NH3) fuel from air and water at any locations where fuel is needed in any quantity required, using clean renewable energy. Green NH3 has two proven green ways to make the fuel and three green ways to use it. For over 10 years we have had the answer to carbon pollution.



Using the Green NH3 Process, Ammonia is easily prepared from hydrogen and nitrogen, from water and air respectively.



The Goal

The Green NH3 goal is to manufacture 100 machines and sell them to large scale farmers and mining companies. “We just want to build machines that are ready, and we can put them on a farm and go,” said Gordon, who has received interest from not only local farmers, but mining companies like Teck Resources, for their Polaris zinc mine in the Northwest Territories. The ultimate goal is to provide Green NH3 Fuel to the everyday consumer to use in any of their combustible engines, from lawn mowers to jet planes.




Who is Roger Gordon?

Roger Gordon is the Inventor of Green NH3. A Halton Hills inventor and pharmaceutical businessman. Roger Gordon has developed a new technology to create carbon-free ammonia. After converting his Ford F350 to use the ammonia as fuel, Roger knew he had a viable option for clean renewable energy. Using only nitrogen and hydrogen, Gordon creates a green ammonia that can be used as fuel for truck engines, farm equipment and even mining operations. When burned as a fuel much like propane, Ammonia emits no carbon air pollution, only nitrogen and clean water. He patented the technology back in 2014 and has since lobbied to get the government on board with his project.